HISTORICAL BOXFORD PRESS



HISTORICAL BOXFORD PRESS

 


Suffolk & Essex Free Press
18 September 1947

In abeyance during the war years, Boxford Horticultural Show was successfully revived in the Rectory Park on Saturday. With the exception of one section, open to residents within an 8-mile radius, it was confined to the parishes of Boxford, Edwardstone and Groton. There were nearly 800 entries, and having regard to the vagaries of the season, the quality of the exhibits was excellent.

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
15 November 1945

A photograph taken at the recent wedding of Miss Betty M. Rumbelow, daughter of Mrs. Lewis F. Rumbelow, "Graham House, Boxford, to Corpl. Kenneth G. Hadley, U.S. Army, son of Mrs. E. Hadley, 21, Prospect Street, Concord, N.H. Formerly a hairdresser at Sudbury, the bride is now a land worker. The bridegroom served with the American Military Police at Sudbury.

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
12 July 1945

Guess who dropped in the other day? None other than our “old” friend Tornado Smith. And he’s doing his tornado stuff again. Mr. G. W. Smith, born at Boxford, has had varied experiences during the war. He wanted to Join the R.A.F. but that was a closed door to him. He had a spell with the Merchant Navy and knew what it was to be in convoy sail with U-boats prowling. He was to be a Commando — Tornado always looks for excitement and adventure. Then he found himself in the N.F.S. but didn’t find a lot of excitement while he served with those who waited for calls. Now he’s "out” again and what must he do but put up his famous Wall of Death at the Kursaal, Southend, where he careers round and round on his motor-cycle, with trick riding thrown in while spectators gasp. In April, Tornado rode his “ordinary,” with the Penny-Farthing Club from Big Ben to Blackheath, and the Pathe Gazette made a film which perhaps we shall see. Now Tornado is developing the idea that came to him during the war for another public thriller. I gather that it will be a daring loop-the-loop by motor-cycle or car. Some of the oak which will be used for the structure was grown in this district. Happy landings!

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
26 April 1945

"Tornado" Smith, the Boxford born rider of the “Wall of Death" at Southend and Sudbury in pre-war days, who has just married again, has scheme afoot for a new form of thrill. What it is to be this time I cannot say for certainty, but I shouldn’t be surprised if he is going to loop the loop or something like that. He purchased a number trees years ago and these are now to be hauled for him and cut into planks by Messrs. Wheeler, of Sudbury. At the moment the biggest tree lies where Mrs. Smith (then Nurse. Ware) felled it, at Leavenheath. The other trees were felled at Boxford. Well, good luck to “Tornado" in his new ventures.

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
25 January 1945

News has been received by Mrs. E. Speller of Colchester, that her son, Driver Ronald J Tricker, of the R.A.S.C. Central Mediterranean Forces, has been killed in action in Greece. Driver Tricker, who was 23 years of age was grandson of the late Mr. Walter Tricker of Brook Hall, Boxford, and spent his boyhood in that village. Prior to enlistment at 19 he was in employment at Cant's Rose Gardens, Colchester.
Attached to an Armoured Brigade, he saw active service in the Middle East, served in Sicily and later in Italy. At the time of his death on December 13th last he was defending a Strong Point in the neighbourhood of Athens and in expressing their sympathy with the bereaved mother, both the Officer Commanding at the unit and his Company Commander referred in glowing terms to his courage and devotion to duty. Much sympathy will be extended to his mother and other near relatives from all his friends in Boxford.

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The Daily Mirror
01 May 1944

George Smith motor-cycle trick rider, rode on the Wall of Death under the name of "Tornado Smith"
He has just volunteered for NFS dispatch riding overseas, and has bee sent to a dispatch riding school to learn how to ride a motor-cycle.

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
20 January 1944

"Tornado" Smith, who used to ride the "Wall of Death" on his motor-cycle at Sudbury and Southend, writes: "When I was at home at Boxford the other day I noticed that most folk around that way are fidgety; with an eye on post-war. You all seem to be saying, 'If this is World War No. 2, - we've had it!' Although you all, as a community have experienced as much as any community outside London and Coventry the excitement and awareness of war-winning activity you all modestly seem to be saying, 'any more to come - glad to take it, but let's get going on reconstruction!' This is supplementary summary by Smithy of his Suffolk's as a jettison from a jet-propulsion plane. That's all for now!"

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Suffolk & Essex Free Press
08 July 1943

Mr. and Mrs. H Tricker, of 6, Bonsey Terrace, Boxford, have just received news of one of their two sons who were serving in the 5th Suffolk Regiment and have been missing since the fall of Singapore. A Japanese censored postcard reached them on Saturday week from Vernon the youngest of five serving brothers, and read: "Am safe and well. I am a prisoner of war and in the best of health. No need to worry." No news has yet come from the older brother, Maurice. Harry, the eldest son, is at present on service in India, while Frank and Lawrence are serving in this country.

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Free Press & Post
22 July 1939

St. Mary's Church, Boxford, was the scene of a pretty wedding on Saturday, when Mr. Edwin Evan Rice, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rice, of Evans Heath Polstead, was married to Miss Gladys Florence Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs Marshall Smith of Stone Street, Boxford. Given away by her father, the bride was attired in a gown of embossed satin with headdress of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of lilies and fern. Her three sisters, the Misses Joan, Peggy and Barbara Smith, were bridesmaids. They wore blue muslin dresses with pink sashes and blue satin shoes. Their head dresses and bouquets were of pink roses and each wore a blue necklace, a gift from the bridegroom. Mr Alan Rice accompanied his brother as best man. The ceremony performed by the Rev. T. Rice (Rector), included the hymns, "Lead us, Heavenly Father, lead us," and "Gracious Spirit Holy Ghost," and the organist (Mr. Deeks) rendered Mendelssohn's Wedding March. A reception was held at the White Hart, and later Mr. and Mrs. Rice left for a touring honeymoon on the South Coast. For traveling the bride chose a navy edge-to-edge coat with accessories to match. The happy couple were the recipients of numerous gifts.

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The Sketch
25 May 1938

"Tornado" Smith and his wife, better known as Miss Marjorie Dare, of the Kursaal "Wall of Death," Southend, are busy on an unusual occupation. They are constructing a 12-ton Bermudan cutter, to be called "Home Made," in which they propose to sail round the world, in spite of the fact that Mr. C. W. Smith has had no previous experience in shipbuilding. For this work, they are using a barn.

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The Citizen
14 October 1936

"LOST MY SENSE OF ROAD SPEED"
Southend Bench yesterday heard a new excuse for speeding.
George ("Tornado") Smith, of the Kursaal, Southend, said that since Easter he had been riding on "the wall of death" at 60 miles an hour and had lost his sense of speed on the road.
He was stated to have travelled at 45 miles an hour in a car on the sea front.
He claimed that at 50 miles an hour he was safer on the road than 90 per cent of the "old women of both sexes" who drove at 15 miles an hour.
The fine was £5.

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Free Press & Post
18 July 1936

Mr "Tornado" Smith, of "Wall of Death" fame, who, with his wife has given demonstrations in Sudbury and Boxford, his native village, has a pet lamb as well as a lioness, and they are very good friends.
"Tornado" writes: "As you will notice, Briton has become a bosom pal to Sparky, the lamb. At the "light luncheon" party Briton was not eating mutton. A strange fact is, that lately, since making the acquaintance of Sparky, Briton refuses to eat mutton! Whether or not she is sensitive that way I do not know, but this peculiarity has made me dubious as to furthering my previous intention to introduce her to a cow, also a horse; I mean, should her sentiment be extended I might be having a fasting lioness on my hands!

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Free Press & Post
25 November 1933

At the Boxford Police Station on Friday, before Sir William Brunette, Albert Baker and Arthur Sandford, labourers, of Boxford, were fined £5 each for unlawfully entering land at Stoke-by-Nayland, in the occupation of Wm. Pickering, with a gun, for the purpose of taking game contrary to the Night Poaching Act. They were charged by Henry Wm. Dudley, gamekeeper, Stoke-by-Nayland.

The Court Room had an unusual appearance, resembling a game dealer's shop, for 15 fine pheasants graced the wall. Both defendants pleaded guilty.

SMART CAPTURE

Mr. J. N. B. Ashton (Bankes Ashton and Co., Bury St. Edmunds) said that on the night of November 13th, the Keepers were watching the land occupied by Mr. Pickering, and over which Lord Davies had the shooting. They heard several shots. Very soon the defendants came to where they were concealed. There was some scuttling. Baker had four pheasants in his pockets, and Sandford dropped a bag containing 11 pheasants. Baker swung his gun round and round to evade capture. No one was hurt, and both defendants gave in and were conveyed to Boxford Police Station.

The defendant Sandford said that some of the pheasants were shot on his father's land.

The gun produced was provided with an up-to-date silencer.

After a short retirement the Chairman told defendants that they had narrowly escaped being sent to prison. The offence to which they had pleaded guilty was a business which had got to be stopped. Each was fined £5; in default one month's imprisonment. In addition, the defendants are to be bound over in £10 not to again so offend for a period of 12 months.

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The Bury Free Press
17 January 1925

The above photograph is of Boxford's best little lady, Mary Gant, and Boxford's best little gentleman, Ronald Stanley. They are scholars at the Council School and were chosen by the ballot of their fellows for this distinction. There was a special prize for each and Mary is seen wearing hers, which was a wristlet watch.

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East Anglian Daily Times
09 January 1909

At Boxford on Friday, before Sir Joshua Rowley, Bart. (in the chair). Sir W. Brampton Gurdon, Bart., and E. L. Englehart, Esq., Marshall Brown, landlord of the Fleece Inn, Boxford, summoned Thomas Smith labourer, for refusing to quit on December 26th. —Complainant stated that he refused to serve the defendant, and sent for the police to eject him, as he refused to go. —P.C. Smith stated that in his presence defendant refused to leave the house, and witness put him out. —Supt. Peake informed the Bench that the defendant was ejected from three public-houses on Boxing Day. —A fine of 2s. 6d. and costs, 19s. in all, was imposed.

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