HISTORICAL BOXFORD PRESS



HISTORICAL BOXFORD PRESS

 


Bury Free Press
31 October 1863

Rose Ann Cousins, pleaded guilty to stealing a pearl necklace and other articles, the property of the Rev. J. Byng, her master, at Boxford. - Mr Bulwer said he was instructed to watch the case on behalf of the accused, who was the daughter of most respectable parents; she had gone out to service at her own request, and up to this time had borne a most excellent character, but had probably been tempted by these gew gaws to commit this offence. -He called witnesses who spoke to her character from childhood. -The Court sentenced her to three month's hard labour, the first and last week in solitude.

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Bury Free Press
11 July 1863

Sarah Balaam, an elderly woman of respectable appearance, was indicted for stealing six knives, six forks, and a cloth, the property of William Gardner, at Boxford, on the 7th May.
Mr. Johnson prosecuted; prisoner was defended by Mr. Bulwer.
Margaret Gardner deposed: I live with my father and mother at Boxford; we had some knives and forks wrapped up in a cloth, which I saw hanging on a nail by the fire-place about a quarter before eleven on the 7th of May; I then went to Mrs. Grigg's, who lives in a house commanding a view of my father's house, so that a person can see anyone who goes into my father's house; I went to inquire the time and was only there two or three minutes, but while I was there I saw Mrs. Balaam go to our door, and when I went home I met her coming away from the house; I asked what she wanted, and she said she wanted father; I told her he was not home; I then went into the house and stayed till about 12 o'clock; nobody came to the house during the interval; when I sat down to dinner I missed the knives and forks from the nail; I went to Mrs. Balaam and asked her what she had done with the knives and forks she took from the fire-place; she said she had not seen any; nobody could have gone to the house while I was absent at Mrs. Grigg's without my seeing them.

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Bury Free Press
23 May 1863

On Monday night last, about 10 o'clock. Mrs. Hallifax, of Edwardston, was being driven in her pony chaise by her butler (named Pilbrough), from the Rectory, Boxford, towards her home. It appears that as soon as the pony left the Rectory gate it ran away, and when it had descended the hill and near to Boxford church, the driver being alarmed, jumped out, with the view, as he said, of trying to get to the pony's head, to stop him, when he was dashed to the ground with great violence, and Mrs. Hallifax was left alone to encounter the horrors of a runaway horse through the town, in a dark night, with no reins in hand.

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Bury Free Press
28 February 1857

19th inst., aged 95, John Jacobs, labourer, Boxford, He was the oldest inhabitant of the parish, and till within a week or two could walk about the village.

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Bury Free Press
07 February 1857

For some time past a bullock, belonging to R. Kemball, Esq., of Groton Hall, near Boxford, in this county, has been observed to be suffering from some unknown malady. Medical advice was obtained, but without any visible effect, when on Thursday last, Mr. Kemball ordered the animal to be killed. After death an examination took place, but no traces of disease could be discovered. In the process of cleaning, however, the butcher, in taking hold of the heart, felt something prick his hand, and upon examination a darning needle, three inches long, was found embedded in the heart of the animal. The needle is now in the possession of Mr. Grimwade, veterinary surgeon, Kersey, who was present at the time.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
06 July 1844

On Friday, the 28th ult., the annual fete took place upon the Rectory Lawn, on which occasion 200 and upwards of the children of the National School were kindly provided with tea, bread and butter, and plum cake, and the day being fine, most of the gentry of the neighbourhood and nearly all the inhabitants of the place were attracted to witness so gratifying a scene, and all who were present received marked kindness and attention from the worthy Recto, the Hon. and Rev. A. F. Phipps, and Lady Mary, which added to the real enjoyment of the day.
On Sunday last, the Hon. and Rev. Charles Fitzroy preached a sermon in Boxford Church, in aid of the funds of the Society for National Education. After the sermon 4l. 13s 3d. were collected at the church doors.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
04 August 1821

On Thursday week, the 26th of July, being the annual ringing day at Boxford, the day was ushered in by the firing of guns and ringing of bells at an early hour. The streets were decorated with a profusion of boughs, and a very handsome bowery was erected, tastefully decorated with flowers and flags. In the evening, about 140 women sat down to tea. and at the head of the table, which was beautifully ornamented with laurels and flowers, was a white flag. bearing the inscription of, God save the Queen. After tea, the women paraded the streets, headed by most of the respectable tradesmen in Boxford shouting God save the Queen, and may she long live to triumph over her enemies. The greatest order and conviviality prevailed throughout the day.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
14 August 1819

To Bury Gaol. Jas. King (by the Rev. F. Creswell) charged on a violent suspicion of having broken into the dwelling-house of Mr. John Elmer, of Boxford, and stolen eight 5l. and ten 1l. notes, a tin box, silver tea spoon, and a pair of silver studs.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
20 August 1814

J. SMITH
BEGS Leave to inform the Public, that his CART sets out from the above Inn (for the Conveyance of Passengers and Parcels) every Friday, at Twelve o'clock, to the Waggon and Horses, Ipswich, and returns the next morning, at Half past Four, through HADLEIGH & BOXFORD, to SUDBURY; and from thence to LAVENHAM and home.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
31 July 1813

On Wednesday night last, or early on Thursday morning, the mill belonging to Mr. Wakelin, of Boxford, was broken into, and two sacks of flour stolen thereout.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
15 August 1812

A gentleman, at Boxford, aged 33, has purchased, from the foundery at Coggeshall, an iron coffin, which weighs 6.5cwt., and is cast to fit him. He exhibits, with much satisfaction, his "last home" to any persons who call upon him; and assures them, that care is taken, to have 2£.'s worth of bread distributed to the poor of the parish on the day in which he shall become a permanent occupier. One of his visitors, whose situation in life compels him to concern himself more about his body before than after death, uttered, on the occasion, the following extemporaneous effusion:-
Whilst I a Box to live in seek,
And strive with care for daily bread,
How strange! another's care bespeak
A Box to rest in when he's dead.

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The Suffolk Chronicle
07 September 1811

On Tuesday the 10th of September, 1811, a PEAL OF EIGHT BELLS will be opened at Boxford, having two Trebles added to the former six; hung by John Naunton, of Ipswich. The company of Gentlemen Ringers, and others, will be esteemed a favour, by their humble servant,
JOHN SMITH, Fleece Inn.
Dinner at Two o'clock

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The Suffolk Chronicle
25 May 1811

Grocer, Linen and Woollen Draper, Hatter, Hosier, Haberdasher, &c. &c.
RETURNS his sincere thanks to his numerous Friends and Public in general, for the very liberal support he has experienced since his commencement in business; and begs leave to inform them, he is just returned from London with a general assortment in the above line, which he intends offering on the very lowest Terms.
Boxford, May 24, 1811

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The Suffolk Chronicle
22 September 1810

Whereas I Elizabeth Garner, wife of Newton Garner, of Boxford, in the county of Suffolk, did glean Barley in a field belonging to Mr. William Green, of Boxford, without his leave, and behaved very insolently to him, and for which he has threatened to prosecute me; but in consideration of my poverty and ignorance of the law, has waved the prosecution. I do hereby thank Mr. Green for his lenity, and promise never to offend again in the same manner.
Witness my mark X
Elizabeth Garner

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The Suffolk Chronicle
12 May 1810

Yesterday morning at 10 c'clock, an alarming fire broke out at the malt-kiln of Mr. Simon Boggis, of Boxford, but with timely assistance it was happily got under.

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